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Guitar Anatomie

The first lesson will show you the parts of the guitar, nothing much to say about this than it's the first step you have to take in order to learn this instrument. There is many different shapes and forms in guitars There is acustic and electric guitars, 6 string or 7 string models some with head some without, I just show you a picture of mine with some basic part names that I explain brifly.


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Head or Headstock :
The headstock is located at the end of the guitar neck furthest from the body. It is fitted with tuners that adjust the tension of the strings, which in turn affects the pitch.

Nut :
The nut is a small strip of bone, plastic, brass, corian, graphite, stainless steel, or other medium-hard material, at the joint where the headstock meets the fretboard. Its grooves guide the strings onto the fretboard, giving consistent lateral string placement. It is one of the endpoints of the strings' vibrating length. It must be accurately cut, or it can contribute to tuning problems due to string slippage, and/or string buzz.

Tuners :
A tuner (also referred to as a machine head, gear head, or tuning machine) is a geared apparatus for tensioning and thereby tuning a string, usually located at the headstock. A headstock has several tuners, one per string.

Neck :
A guitar's frets, fretboard, tuners, head, and truss rod, all attached to a long wooden extension, collectively constitute its neck.

Fretboard :
Also called the fingerboard, the fretboard is a piece of wood embedded with metal frets that comprises the top of the neck.

Frets :
Frets are metal strips (usually nickel alloy or stainless steel) embedded along the fretboard and located at exact points that divide the scale length in accordance with a specific mathematical formula. Pressing a string against a fret determines the strings' vibrating length and therefore its resultant pitch. The pitch of each consecutive fret is defined at a half-step interval on the chromatic scale.

Body :
Most guitar bodies are made of wood.

Pickups :
Pickups are transducers attached to a guitar that detect (or "pick up") string vibrations and convert the mechanical energy of the string into electrical energy. The resultant electrical signal can then be electronically amplified.

Bridge :
The bridge holds the strings in place on the body.

On almost all modern electric guitars, the bridge is adjustable for each string so that intonation stays correct up and down the neck. If the open string is in tune but sharp or flat when frets are pressed, the bridge can be adjusted with a screwdriver or hex key to remedy the problem. In general, flat notes are corrected by moving the bridge forward and sharp notes by moving it backwards. On an instrument correctly adjusted for intonation, the actual length of each string from the nut to the bridge saddle will be slightly but measurably longer than the scale length of the instrument. This additional length is called compensation, which flattens all notes a bit to compensate for the sharping of all fretted notes caused by stretching the string during fretting.

Control Knobs :
Volume, Tone and pickup selector controls, let the player adjust the sound of the guitar that are generated through the pickups. The pickup selector looks different in most cases.